Making Changes Obvious

I am a creature of sartorial habit – a fashion icon for those who have one ‘look’ for the season – and stick to it.

photo from another day – but you see what I mean

Let’s just say that last week, five days worth of washing saw six short-sleeved black tee-shirts and two 3/4 sleeved black tee-shirts on the line (along with other clothes – I hasten to add) but there’s the thing – I like black cotton tee-shirts – I have many, and usually add a couple of short sleeved and a couple of 3/4 or long-sleeved each year. The previous ones just move down the wearing order – oldest for working in the garden or doing the cleaning, the next  for work-wear (writing / general clean in-house occupations), and the newer ones for venturing outside the environs of our property.

This year I found, to my delight, a pair of black and white patterned trousers, cool, comfortable and not too expensive. I was so delighted that I bought a second pair. Then they went and had a SALE … so I’m afraid I have to admit – I bought a third pair.

This now meant that I could be seen apparently wearing the ‘same’ clothes everyday of the week when out and about. (I have old black jeans I wear for gardening and cleaning, and I like to wear long skirts around the house too)

Ok, got the picture?  Now it may seem to the casual observer that not only does it look like I never change my tee-shirt (who notices whether the sleeves are long or short?) but that I never change my trousers either – as these patterned trousers were very noticeable!wp_20160920_10_19_31_pro

In fact – even I was getting bored with them being black and white – so I had a look at what they were made of (Viscose) and then I purchased a packet of dye* – viscose being one of the materials that will dye properly.  *Not a ‘dye in the machine pack’ this time … as I had a plan.

I wanted burgundy but the nearest they seem to do is burlesque red … so that had to do. I chose one pair to remain white and set these aside! Then I chose the pair to go burlesque red and having got them thoroughly wet and wrung out, added them to the mix first. After the first fifteen minutes of agitation of these I added the second pair – with the hope of a lighter shade. These I also agitated for 15 minutes.

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I’m pleased with the results

Gazing at the colour of the dye water I thought it had some life left in it yet and I suddenly remembered I had a white Tee-shirt (yes I had bought a white one at some time – for some unknown reason) – but generally didn’t wear it since it had been splashed by turmeric, leaving a mucky-looking indelible stain near the hem.

I grabbed the tee-shirt – wetted it, rolled it and secured it with a number of tight elastic bands for a tie-dye effect. This also entered the dye and was squeezed and agitated.

After the full time I duly cold washed, then washed the trousers and the, now unrolled, tee-shirt. wp_20160919_10_48_02_pro

I am pleased with the results for the trousers (see above) – I now have three distinct patterned trousers and a tee-shirt I can wear without a grubby-looking stain (albeit probably for gardening 😉 NB: It looks pinker than this photo shows)

So, £2.50 – a change of look – which I hope will dispel rumours before they start 🙂 .

And I learnt something (which usually makes me happy) – as I realised that I had no idea what Viscose was – apart from a material that took a dye well. Now I just hope that the viscose I am wearing was made using the more up-to-date methods of production as the older methods are not too good for the environment.

Viscose is, essentially, made from wood. The old method of changing wood into a viscous material (cellulose) that would make a ‘silk-like thread’ uses a lot of harsh chemicals and a lot of water. [The other name for Vicose is Rayon (a combination of the idea of the sun-rays and the word cotton) and was first advertised as Artificial Silk] Modern methods of production are considerably better, less damaging to the environment – but how to tell how your garment’s threads were made – now there’s a problem!?

Do any of you have adventures with dyeing?

Do you use the machine-wash dyes – or play around?

Do share – you know I love to hear from you

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2 thoughts on “Making Changes Obvious

  1. Hi Ann

    I love how the T-Shirt turned out! How did you roll / tie it to make it lighter coloured on the top and darker in the bottom?

    When I find something comfortable I often buy the same trousers and tops again – so I know very well the issue of people thinking I do not change my clothes because it seems I wear the same item many times. But mine have lots of colours in them so dyeing is not an option for me.

    Susi

  2. Hi Susi,
    Thanks for your comment – it’s nice to know I’m not alone!
    As for the tee-shirt. I first wet it and wrung it out, then tightly rolled it from the top down to the hem. Then folded over the sleeves and put on the tight elastic bands (or doubled them up). One ‘centrally’ (though I’d mark the centre somehow if I was doing it again as the middle line does not quite line up with the absolute centre of the neckline) and then the others at intervals right out to the ends of the sausage. As the fabric was wet it didn’t draw the dye-liquid in so much and though I manipulated it and squeezed it ultimately the outer layers got more contact with the dye – giving the darker to lighter range from base to top in sort-of bands from the rolling (as well as the vertical stripes from the elastic bands) Hope this explains it 🙂
    best Ann

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